Home Health Could your breath enable your phone to identify you?

Could your breath enable your phone to identify you?

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Facial recognition and fingerprint recognition are becoming common security features on our mobile phones, and now your breathing may be a potential option for biometric security. Chemical Communications..

Researchers at the Institute for Leading Materials Chemistry at Kyushu University have worked with the University of Tokyo to develop an odor sensor that can identify people by analyzing their breath, the report said.

“Recently, human scents have emerged as a new class of biometrics, basically using a unique chemical composition to identify who we are,” said the lead author of the study. Chaiyanut Jirayupat states in the release.

Bangkok, Thailand-December 12, 2015: Apple iPhone 5s with one hand displaying screen for entering passcode. Researchers at the Institute for Leading Materials Chemistry at Kyushu University have worked with the University of Tokyo to develop an odor sensor that can identify people by analyzing their breath, the report said.
(IStock)

The release states that the “heat and moisture” contains a 16-channel sensor that has tested up to 20 individuals with an average accuracy rate of 97.8%.

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Researchers have pointed out that current techniques rely on biometrics, which are usually done via voice, fingerprints, palm prints, and the face. In some cases, ear acoustics and finger veins are used to protect the safety of human property, the study authors said in a report.

“These techniques depend on the physical uniqueness of each individual, but are not absolutely certain. Physical properties can be copied and compromised by injury,” Jirayupat said. Was mentioned in the release, which is one of the reasons why the team considered other biometric methods. ..

Researchers have pointed out that current techniques rely on biometrics, which are usually done via voice, fingerprints, palm prints, and the face. In some cases, ear acoustics and finger veins are used to protect the safety of human property, the study authors said in a report.

Researchers have pointed out that current techniques rely on biometrics, which are usually done via voice, fingerprints, palm prints, and the face. In some cases, ear acoustics and finger veins are used to protect the safety of human property, the study authors said in a report.
(IStock)

Investigators examined gas compounds produced by the skin of individuals, but said they were restricted because the skin did not produce enough compounds for the machine to detect. This will allow the team to investigate whether a person’s breathing is a viable option.

“Concentrations of volatile compounds from the skin can drop to billions or trillions, but compounds exhaled from exhaled breath can reach one millionth,” Jirayupat said. Explained in the release. The authors of the study also stated in the report that human breathing is used to identify whether a person has certain illnesses, including diabetes, cancer, and even COVID-19. ..

Researchers have developed a sensory sensor that can identify a specific range of compounds. They analyzed the participants’ breathing and determined that 28 compounds contained in human breathing could be used for biometrics. The sensor data passed through a machine learning system that analyzes each subject’s respiratory composition and creates profiles to identify individuals, the release said.

Dr. Brett Case sterilizes the suit with a disinfectant spray before treating the virus that causes COVID-19. Researchers have developed a sensory sensor that can identify a specific range of compounds. They analyzed the participants' breathing and determined that 28 compounds contained in human breathing could be used for biometrics.

Dr. Brett Case sterilizes the suit with a disinfectant spray before treating the virus that causes COVID-19. Researchers have developed a sensory sensor that can identify a specific range of compounds. They analyzed the participants’ breathing and determined that 28 compounds contained in human breathing could be used for biometrics.
(Matt Miller, St. Louis / Washington University School of Medicine)

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The team tested a breath sample of 6 people and then a larger sample of 20 subjects.

The findings consistently show that both sample groups can identify individuals with an average accuracy of just under 98%.

“This was a diverse group of individuals of different ages, genders and nationalities. It’s encouraging to see such high accuracy overall,” Takeshi Yanagida, who led the study, said in the release.

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In this study, subjects fasted for 6 hours before being tested. In the release, Yanagida said, “The next step is to improve this technology so that it works regardless of diet. Thankfully, the current research is to add sensors and collect data. We have found that we can overcome this obstacle. ”

However, do not hold your breath if you are waiting for this option on your next smartphone. The authors of the study state that more work is needed before they arrive at the device.

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