Home Health Chronic lack of sleep may negatively affect our immune cells, raising certain health risks: New study

Chronic lack of sleep may negatively affect our immune cells, raising certain health risks: New study

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Losing an hour and a half of sleep consistently each night can lead to inflammatory and cardiovascular disease, according to new research from the Icahn School of Medicine in Mount Sinai, New York City.

The study, published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine on Wednesday, September 21, 2022, found that chronic sleep deprivation can affect a person’s immune cells, causing inflammation in the body.

“Increased inflammation predisposes you to a variety of problems, especially cardiovascular disease,” co-principal investigator Cameron McAlpine, Ph.D., assistant professor of medicine (cardiology) at Icahn Mount Sinai, told Fox News Digital. rice field. interview.

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McAlpine is one of the researchers participating in the new study.

Lead author Dr. Philip Swirsky, director of the Cardiovascular Institute at Icahn Mount Sinai, said in a news release: Especially for those with underlying medical conditions. ”

The lead author of the new study said adults need to get seven to eight hours of sleep per night “to prevent inflammation and disease, especially for those with underlying medical conditions.”
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The researchers said the study is beginning to identify mechanisms in the body that link sleep and immunological health over the long term.

This study reveals that sleep disruption can affect cellular programming and the rate of immune cell production in humans and mice. This can cause immune cells to lose their ability to protect against disease.

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It can also affect the production rate of these cells, exacerbating infection.

“Another important observation [is that] That sleep reduces inflammation, and conversely, sleep interruption increases inflammation. “

Researchers have also found disturbing evidence that these effects can be long-lasting in mouse model studies.

“This is important because sleep reduces inflammation, and conversely, sleep interruption increases inflammation, another important observation.

McAlpine told Fox News Digital that the purpose of the study is to better understand how chronic sleep disorders affect cardiovascular disease, which develops over time due to inflammation. .

A new study compared the long-term effects of chronic sleep deprivation with short-term sleep disruptions over several days.

A new study compared the long-term effects of chronic sleep deprivation with short-term sleep disruptions over several days.
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These findings may aid research into other inflammatory diseases and conditions within the body, such as arthritis.

The study compared the long-term effects of chronic sleep deprivation with short-term sleep interruptions of a few days, McAlpine said.

The study helped identify the biological mechanisms and pathways that link sleep and immune system health over time, he said.

A group of participants then reduced their sleep time by 90 minutes each night for six weeks, and blood was drawn and analyzed again.

Researchers looked at 14 healthy adults who regularly slept eight hours a night.

Participants were initially monitored as they slept at least 8 hours per night for 6 weeks. The research team took blood samples and analyzed the participants’ immune cells.

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A group of participants then reduced their sleep time by 90 minutes each night for six weeks, and blood was drawn and analyzed again.

All 14 participants in the new study "Important change" According to the findings, in immune cells caused by sleep deprivation.

All 14 participants in the new study showed “significant changes” in immune cells caused by sleep deprivation, according to the findings.
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Investigators compared blood samples and found that all 14 participants had significant changes in their immune cells, attributed to lack of sleep.

Decreased sleep blood samples showed changes in DNA structure and increased numbers of immune cells.

Normally, in conditions of heightened inflammation, health experts explained to Fox News Digital that the number of immune cells increases.

The increased inflammation in mice that had fragmented sleep didn’t reverse after sleep was restored, McAlpine told Fox News Digital.

The researchers also looked at the effects of sleep disturbances in mice.

In the mouse model, we let a group of mice sleep undisturbed and another group awake all night for 16 weeks.

Mice in the disrupted sleep group reportedly experienced uninterrupted sleep recovery for the next 10 weeks.

"Our findings suggest that sleep recovery cannot fully reverse the effects of poor quality sleep.Even after weeks of recovery sleep, immune stem cells detect molecular signatures of sleep deprivation I can do it."

“Our findings suggest that sleep restoration cannot fully reverse the effects of poor-quality sleep. Even after weeks of restorative sleep, immune stem cell molecular signatures of sleep deprivation can be detected.”
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The research team analyzed immune stem cells and cells from a group of mice, and the results were consistent with human studies, McAlpine said.

“We found in [both] human and mouse models [that] Interrupting sleep increases inflammation in the blood. ”

The heightened inflammatory state in mice with fragmented sleep was not reversed even after sleep was restored, McAlpine told Fox News Digital.

Not all stem cells responded the same to lack of sleep, he said.

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“Unfortunately, human studies did not assess recovery, but [we] I saw the recovery of the mouse. We also found that in mice, some parameters of inflammation returned to normal levels with sleep recovery, but not all.”

McAlpine said some cells remained (after sleep recovery) making the mice prone to inflammation.

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The collaborators said in a news release: Restorative sleep. This can cause cells to react in an inappropriate way, leading to inflammation and disease.

McAlpine told Fox News Digital that the research team plans to do more research to understand which genes are affected by sleep, or the pathways of genes that may respond to sleep. . This will allow researchers to better understand the effects of sleep.

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